NGC 2903: Deep Sky Photo with the iPhone 6

ngc-2903

NGC 2903 taken with an iPhone! NGC 2903 is 30 million light years away and found in the constellation Leo.

This is the most difficult deep sky photo that I’ve taken with my iPhone to date. This was taken in town in an urban area on the Bortle scale so the sky was quite bright! It was also very windy constantly blowing about 25 miles an hour, so I tried to build a wind block for my telescope and had some success. I took about 45 minutes worth of 30 second exposures which gave me 90 frames to work with. And in the end I could only use 12 frames to stack. A lot of that had to do with the wind, and of course the other part of it was due to my mount.

Details –

Celestron Nexstar 8SE

Televue 20mm Plossl

Celestron F/6.3 focal reducer

iPhone 6

Orion Steadypix Adapter

Night Cap Pro App

ISO – 8000

Exposure – 30 seconds

Frames – 12 frames stacked

Stacked in Nebulosity 4

Processed in Pixinsight

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M 82: Deep Sky Photo with the iPhone 6

m82

M 82 the Cigar Galaxy taken with the iPhone 6! M 82 is 12 million light years away located in Ursa Major.

I’m learning some new things. This is a re-edit of a previous stack of M 82 frames.

I captured this image in my backyard in the middle of town with lots of light pollution. The sky and conditions, however, were pristine. Calm, clear, and no moon. And it was cold, around 15*F.

Details

Celestron Nexstar 8SE

Televue 20mm Plossl

Celestron f/6.3 reducer

iPhone 6

Orion Steadypix Adapter

Night Cap Pro app

ISO – 8000

Exposure – 15 seconds

Frames – 6 frames

Stacked in Nebulosity

Edited in Pixinsight

NGC 2392 Eskimo Nebula: Deep Sky Photo with iPhone 6

eskimo-nebula-stacked-edited

NGC 2392 the Eskimo Nebula! This is a planetary nebula in the constellation Gemini, and it’s about 4,200 light years from earth. –

This along with another photo I took were kind of experiments the other night from my backyard. It was windy and shaking my telescope, but I wanted to test how well it tracked over a long period of time. So I just set my phone out there attached to the eyepiece centered on the Eskimo Nebula and let Nightcap Pro take picture after picture. I probably let it take 25 second exposures for 45 minutes. It was interesting to find that the Eskimo nebula moved all around the center of my eyepiece. With the naked eye it wouldn’t move near enough to notice, but with a camera it was very noticeable. I only ended up getting seven or eight frames that were worth stacking after all that time. Obviously the wind had a lot to do with that, but the tracking is not good enough to take long exposures. 15 to 20 second exposures seem to be pretty good. I already knew this, but it was a good test anyway! And a cool picture 📷

Details –

Celestron Nexstar 8SE

Televue 20mm Plossl

Celestron F/6.3 focal reducer

iPhone 6

Orion Steadypix Adapter

Night Cap Pro App

ISO – 8000

Exposure – 25 seconds

Frames – 7 frames stacked

Stacked in Nebulosity 4

Light editing in Lightroom

M31 Andromeda Galaxy: Second Attempt with the iPhone 6

andromeda-stacked-edited

This is my latest attempt at the Andromeda galaxy with my iPhone, through my scope. Andromeda is getting lower in the west, so I’m starting to feel a little urgency. There’s a little more detail in this one than before and certainly better color! #nightsky #stargazing #universe #galaxy #andromeda #space #longexposure #iphone #celestron #nightcappro

 

Details –

Celestron Nexstar 8SE

Televue 20mm Plossl

Celestron F/6.3 focal reducer

iPhone 6

Orion Steadypix Adapter

Night Cap Pro App

ISO – 8000

Exposure – 15 seconds

Frames – 10 frames stacked

Stacked in Nebulosity 4

Light editing in Lightroom

Star Trails with the iPhone 6

star-trails

Star trails! This is my second attempt at star trails with my iPhone and it certainly turned out better than the first time. Made it out to our favorite dark site with @tomrudkin@emilylavon@collinrudkin, and @sarah.rudkin although the full moon did come up and try to ruin things as usual. This is a much longer exposure, about 1 hour and 15 minutes!


Details

iPhone 6
Alaska Bear battery tank
Gorrillapod
Night Cap Pro App
1hr 15min Exposure

Almach Double Star: Deep Sky Photo with the iPhone 6

Taken with NightCap Pro

Almach is a double star system in the renowned Andromeda constellation. It is one of the finest double stars in the sky! When looking at the stars with the naked eye it looks like just one single bright star, however, when you look through a telescope you can easily split the apparent single star into two.

One is of a golden color and the other portrays a bluish hue. It turns out, shockingly, that the star system is actually a quadruple star system! However, without a very powerful telescope we can’t see any more than the gold and blue stars.

This is a single shot taken at 300x.

 

Details and Equipment

Celestron Nexstar 8SE

Televue 20mm Plossl

Celestron 3x Barlow

iPhone 6

Orion Steadypix Adapter

Night Cap Pro App

ISO 80

Exposure 1/5

M76 Little Dumbbell Nebula: Deep Sky Photo with the iPhone 6

little-dumbbell

This is a planetary nebula that looks remarkably similar to the Dumbbell Nebula which is why it’s gets its name “little.” It is much smaller than the Dumbbell Nebula, harder to see and capture but well worth it.

I captured this image the other night from my backyard in the middle of town with lots of light pollution. The sky and conditions, however, were pristine. Calm, clear, and no moon. It was cold, around 15*F.

Details:
Celestron Nexstar 8SE
iPhone 6
Night Cap Pro App
Orion Steadypix Adapter
Televue 20mm Plossl
Celestron f/6.3 reducer
ISO 8000
15 second exposures
8 frames stacked
Stacked with Nebulosity 4
Light editing in Lightroom